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20121225
20121225
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conversations] >> we continue our live coverage from the national book awards here in new york city. this is one of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would
. >> yeah. good thing you're awake. national affairs editor for "new york" magazine and msnbc political analyst, john heilemann. >> hi! >> yeah. hi. and from cnbc headquarters, co-host of cnbc's "squawk box," andrew ross sorkin. >> do i need to make a joke about school being out? >> that's so yesterday. we're tired of that, actually. >> you like kind of grown. >> he went from being a little kid to adorable. >> he's a grizzled old vet. the grey hair is coming in. >> and from washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent, host of "andrea mitchell reports", the lovely andrea mitchell. >> happy holidays. >> and "washington post" columnist, jonathan capehart. thank you all so much for being with us. and why don't we just start really quickly with the story of the year, mika. and that, of course, barack obama wins, the republicans lose. and in a way that perhaps is more telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does. and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff neg
expect, new york, london and frankfurt and tokyo within interesting outlier and the outliers were a lot of my story places like ashburn virginia in unincorporated suburb where if you ask internet people in the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with what are the capitals of the internet they would say new york london los angeles and ashford. those are the places, the short list of places that are by far the hotspots, super nose on the global internet. >> host: would have the super nose look like mr. blum when you look at them? >> guest: from the outside they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. there are quite generic from the outside. they try to hide in plain sight as you are driving by them. some of them are art deco buildings that used to belong to western western union or telecom palaces. others are kind of from operators like to call it cyber stickler, cyber stick an adjective of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to
to celebrate christmas. back to you in new york. merry christmas and we'll check back in later. >> pime in virginia, waking up to a white christmas. charlottesville is a beautiful town. big tornado threat . look at the weather maps. we'll show you the current temperatures it is cold out there. two degrees in rapid stee and in minneapolis . we are big problems that are happening for todaytomorrow and thursday that causes a lot of difficulties for travel. you know what, i have my clicker. >> you have had tech problems. rick lost his ipad. >> get it together. what is going on. >> this is it a tech problem. can you fix it >> there is it big fog problems in atlanta. they can't see 10 feet. >> i will show you weather maps and there is big fog. we could have talked about the biggest tonch torn outbreak. houston to alabama and any place in between. watch that closely . >> thoo is frustrating if you are trying to travel get to your family. you want to be home. >> you need to be safe more than anything . >> if you have an option of going to a basement or not, choose the one with the basement. cou
. this is the front page of "the new york times." host: the story goes on. this is luke rosak. host: it goes on to talk about that story. front page of "the new york daily news." this stemming from upstate new york about a sniper that set fire to a building and goes on to shoot two firemen as they were trying to take care of the fire. eric from pittsburgh, pennsylvania on the democrat's line. good morning. caller: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it was aired on c-span last evening. it was about progressivism and how would differs from thomas jefferson's vision and view of the basis for our government founded in natural rights. wilson was the opposite in his view. a little bit of a man involved subject. the movement started with president wilson and basically 100 years ago. george will analyze it in his lecture at the differences between the declaration of indepen
was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white house, tuesday evening on c- span. >> george will spoke at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion in politics. the speech was hosted by the john danforth center on politics. we will hear from former senator john danforth, just before mr. will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he gr
different. there was a very nice article in the "new york times" magazine on mother's day about children who have these emerging traits and how we would develop and understand and treat them. it's a small percentage. my goal is to develop better treatment so they can keep them off that trajectory towards life course persistent problems. >> are you saying that people that have the brain structure that you have identified will always be lacking in volitional control or impulse receive to the extent that they are criminals? do we have a subset of people that are criminals because of their brains? >> i should really differentiate psychopathy from criminality. there are a lot of reasons why individuals engage in different criminal activity. it's a very small percentage of prisoners that are just about 15 to 20% depending on security level. those individuals are the ones that present the highest risk for reoffending. those are the ones that we say have the personality disorders, et cetera. actually, there is an amazingly good treatment programs that have been developed especially with youth that c
the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were traveling across the country. they stopped a long way from las veg
't have virginia or new york, it wouldn't work. so it came about one of the great informal agreements in american legal history, there was an agreement, an informal agreement, that if the constitution were ratified as written bit 1787 convention, that there would be a bill of rights. and the statesmen, and there were statesmen in those days, kept their word so we had a bill of rights in 1791. and the result is we have a hamiltonian structure and jeffersonian bill of rights. and let me mention a few things about each of those. insofar as structure, they are different structures but one of the principal ones is separation of powers and checks and balances. we use those terms often interchangeably, separation of powers and checks and balances but they actually have a different thrust. separation of powers. teaches each brafrpbl of the government has a certain autonomy to act on its own. checks and balances works the other way around. checks and balances indicates the government cannot of course operate unless the branches interact with each other. there's a certain newtonian metaphor to
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9